Michal

by Lemonjello Redenbacher on August 6, 2009

Why did you take out the “e”?  What the fuck is wrong with the “e”?  What did that little “e” ever do to anyone?

Sorry, little “e.”  Some people just can’t leave well enough alone.

{ 9 comments… read them below or add one }

Kelli August 6, 2009 at 12:04 pm

I have to agree with you on this one…dumb, just plain dumb! Oh, and you need to allow us to add names to your list…

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Lemonjello Redenbacher August 6, 2009 at 12:32 pm

Yes ma’am — Orangello is working on that, I believe. I definitely want people to be able to submit their own. Post it here if you have one — or email me with it at lemonjello@stupidkidnames.com and I will give you credit for it.

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Stephanie August 28, 2009 at 7:11 pm

Actually the name Michal is a female name from the Old Testament (1 Samuel to be precise). So if you want to rail at someone for giving their child a fucked up name you are going to have to start with King Saul.

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Lemonjello Redenbacher August 28, 2009 at 7:55 pm

Okay, then — fuck you, King Saul, whomever you may have been! Your naming skills suck.

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Anonymous August 11, 2011 at 8:44 pm

It’s female Hebrew name, NOT MICHAEL.
It’s pronounced ‘mee-hall’
It’s common in Israel. It’s not your language or culture, so leave it.

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Lemonjello Redenbacher August 12, 2011 at 6:28 am

Yeah – but I found it lurking in my culture, so I will gladly fuck with it all I wish.

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Anna December 26, 2011 at 5:10 am

you’ll find more and more new things lurking in your culture and I’m afraid you’ll have to accept it. :) You even have laws to make you accept it ! ha ha ha !

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Linda February 10, 2012 at 8:21 pm

I don’t know about Hebrew, but Michal is simply Michael in some languages (Slovak, Czech, Polish, possibly some others), maybe the person whose name it was came from there? Just a thought.

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knowall besserwisser March 9, 2012 at 7:31 am

Nope, in Polish the name is spelled “Michał”, with stroked “l”, and is pronounced almost, but not totally unlike “mykhaw”.
One of my relatives lives in England and, while there, his sons are called Michael and Anthony (or possibly Antony), both of which are themselves quite common and have common equivalents in Polish.

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